Amir Ali Borhani, MD*

Amir Borhani

Amir Ali Borhani, MD*

Appointments/Affiliations: 

Assistant Professor
Department of Radiology - Abdominal Imaging Division
Chief, Body CT

Presbyterian University Hospital
Suite 9055
200 Lothrop Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Liver-Related Work

Clinical and Research Interests: I am a radiologist with fellowship training in abdominal imaging and abdominal interventions and am a member of UPMC Presbyterian abdominal imaging division. I also serve as the chief of body CT of UPMC Imaging Enterprise. I have special interest in liver imaging and perform multimodality liver imaging (CT, MRI, US) as well as percutaneous hepatobiliary interventions as part of my clinical duties on daily basis. 
 
My research interests include imaging methods for noninvasive detection and quantification of liver fibrosis and steatosis (on both human and animal models) as well as investigating the novel imaging biomarkers and radionomics of hepatocellular carcinoma. 
 
Ongoing Research Studies:
  1. Non-invasive quantification of liver fat using novel spectral CT techniques (collaboration with Dr. Alan Tsung’s lab and with General Electrics). 
  2. Evaluation of longitudinal changes in liver morphology in setting of NAFLD and NASH cirrhosis (collaboration with Dr. Behari). 
  3. Investigation of spectral Doppler imaging as a non-invasive imaging marker of fibrosis in setting of congestive hepatopathy. 
  4. Investigating role of CT texture analysis as a novel imaging method for prediction of tumor biology of abdominal tumors (funded by NPF).
  5. Serum leptin as a biomarker of malnutrition in decompensated cirrhosis (collaboration with Dr. Behari and Dr. Rachakonda).
 
Research Service: Our division can provide help with quantitative image analysis such as segmentation and volumetric assessment of liver. We also have experience with the software used for body muscle mass and visceral/subcutaneous fat quantification for detection of sarcopenia.


 

 

Special Interest Groups: 
Chronic Liver Injury
Liver Tumorigenesis